Contact NYSAC:

Ndidi Massay, Interim Chair

New York State Athletic Commission
123 William Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10038

E-mail the Athletic Commission
Telephone: (212) 417-5700
Fax: (212) 417-4987

Deaf, hard of hearing and speech-disabled callers, please use 7-1-1

Media Inquiries



Agendas & Open Meeting Documents


Commission Bulletins

2016 New York State Athletic Commission Licensees

Special Notice

*   *   *   S P E C I A L   N O T I C E   *   *   *

New York State Athletic Commission Approves Proposed Regulations To Govern Combat Sports in New York

The New York State Athletic Commission has proposed the addition of 19 NYCRR Parts 206-214 to implement the provisions of Ch. 32 of the Laws of 2016, and is providing a 45-day public comment period on the proposed regulations.

The full text of the proposed regulatory provisions has been posted. Please click the link below to view the proposed regulations:

New York State Athletic Commission – Proposed Regulations –19 NYCRR Parts 206–214 (pdf)

Public comment will be received until August 27, 2016. Any interested person or entity may submit written comments (data, views, or statements) regarding the proposed regulations by mail to: James Leary, Esq., One Commerce Plaza, 99 Washington Ave., 11th Floor, Albany, NY 12231-0001; or by email to James.Leary@dos.ny.gov.


Testing (Boxing Only)

The New York State Athletic Commission will hold testing for Seconds, Managers, and Matchmaker licenses at
10:00 am at 123 William Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY on the following date:

Monday, August 8, 2016

Monday, September 12, 2016

Monday, October 10, 2016

Monday, November 14, 2016

Monday, December 12, 2016

These are BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. To schedule an appointment, call 212-417-5692 or email Ana.Rivas@dos.ny.gov
*2016 Licensing Period lasts from October 1st, 2015 through September 30th, 2016.


In Memory of Acclaimed Boxing Writer Jack Obermayer

The New York State Athletic Commission would like to pass on its sincerest condolences to the family and friends of long-time and acclaimed boxing writer, Jack Obermayer, who passed away on Friday, June 24, 2016 at the age of 72.

Obermayer wrote for a number of boxing publications throughout his career and was a beloved figure at ringside, having covered over 3,500 professional fight cards. In 2010, he won the Barney Nagler Award for Long and Meritorious Service by the Boxing Writers Association of America. Our thought and prayers go out to all who knew him.


In Memory of Muhammad Ali (1942-2016)

The New York State Athletic Commission and the entire New York boxing community mourn the passing of boxing legend and three-time world heavyweight champion, Muhammad Ali, on June 3, 2016, but celebrate the rich legacy he left, especially in New York, both inside and outside the ring. Our condolences and prayers go out to the Ali family, his friends, and fans.


Martez Potter (1990-2016)

The New York State Athletic Commission would like to pass on its sincerest sympathies and condolences to the family and friends of Syracuse, NY super middleweight boxer Martez Potter, who passed away on June 1, 2016. Potter compiled an 8-0, 1 KO record as a middle and super middleweight.


Action Shots from Barclays Center Card on Saturday, April 16, 2016

Action Shots from Barclays Center Card on Saturday, April 16, 2016

2016 New York State Boxing Hall of Fame Ceremony

On Sunday, April 3, 2016, more than 300 members of New York's boxing community came together at Russo's on the Bay in Howard Beach, NY for the 5th Annual New York Stating Boxing Hall of Fame Class of 2016 Induction Ceremony.

View the New York State Boxing Hall of Fame official press release and event photos HERE.

The New York State Athletic Commission would like to thank the New York Stating Boxing Hall of Fame/Ring 8 President Bob Duffy for once again putting on a great show honoring the new inductees.

NYSBHOP Class of 2016

NYSBHOF Class of 2016 (L-R): Seated - Vilomar Fernandez, Dennis Rappaport, Randy Gordon and Ed Brophy; Standing: Aaron Davis and Joe DeGuardia

All photos courtesy of Peter Frutkoff


In Memory of Jospeh DeGuardia, Sr. (1930-2016)

The New York State Athletic Commission would like to pass on its sincerest condolences to the family and friends of Joseph DeGuardia Sr., a highly-respected figure in the New York, and national, boxing communities, who passed away March 8, 2016 at the age of 86. He was a professional boxer and lifelong resident of Morris Park in The Bronx, where he founded the Morris Park Boxing Club. For more on DeGuardia, go here.


Action Shots from The Theater at Madison Square Garden, Saturday, February 27, 2016

Action Shots from The Theater at Madison Square Garden, Saturday, February 27, 2016

Action Shots from Barclays Center, Saturday, January 16, 2016

Action Shots from Barclays Center, Saturday, January 16, 2016



Injury Awareness

CONCUSSION: Let's Knock Out Brain Injuries in Boxing!

DEHYDRATION: Stay Hydrated and Avoid Injury Inside and Outside The Ring


Approved Gloves

See what brands, styles and weights of boxing gloves are currently approved by the New York State Athletic Commission.


June in New York State
Boxing History

On July 9, 1995, Tracy Harris Patterson from New Paltz, NY via Grady Alabama, and adopted son of former Golden Gloves and World Champion Floyd Patterson, knocked down Eddie Hopson four times in the second round to win the IBF Junior Lightweight in Reno, Nevada. Patterson finished his career with 63 wins (43 by KO), 8 losses and two draws. Throughout his career, he fought a multitude of times all over his adopted home state of New York, including Poughkeepsie, Long Beach, Glens Falls, Binghamton, Canastota, Albany, Kerhonkson, the Catskills, Hauppauge, Syracuse and New York City. 

On July 10, 1922, Jake LaMotta was born on the lower east side of Manhattan. He was a World Middleweight Champion and was famously portrayed by Robert De Niro in the film Raging Bull. He was the first man to beat Sugar Ray Robinson. He finished with a career record of 83 wins (30 by KO), 19 losses and four draws. He is a member of the International Boxing Hall of Fame and was ranked 52nd on Ring Magazine's 80 Greatest Fighters of The Past 80 Years. The magazine also ranked him as one of the 10 greatest middleweights of all time.

On July 21, 1982, in New York’s Madison Square Garden, the great  Salvador “The Invincible Eagle” Sanchez had his first and only fight in New York State, defeating Azumah Nelson via a 15th round TKO to retain his WBC World Featherweight title in what was truly a match for the ages between these famed warriors.

Throughout the bout, Nelson was seen as the aggressor, landing more punches per round and outworking Sanchez. However, Sanchez broke through Nelson's ferocious attacks and dropped Nelson with a devastating left hook in the seventh round. Nelson, though, beat the count and returned to form after that wake-up call. With both fighters exhausted going into the final round, Sanchez came out and hurt Nelson with a hard right and another devastating left hook, which left Nelson staggering badly just before falling into a corner. Once again, Nelson got back up.  Sanchez then seized the opportunity, landing a few more serious blows, staggering Nelson again just before the referee jumps in to call a halt at the 1:47 mark of the fifteenth and final round. Sanchez showed his greatness by stopping a young and aggressive Azumah Nelson. 

Regrettably and sadly for boxing fans around the world, this would be the champion’s last fight. While training for a rematch with Juan Laporte, who he had defeated in a 15-roound unanimous decision in El Paso, TX the previous year, Sanchez died in a car crash the early morning of August 12, 1982, at the age of 23. 

Salvador Sanchez finished his career undefeated as champion and was posthumously inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991. 

Salvador Sanchez’ record was 44 Wins (32 Knockouts), one defeat and one draw.

On July 3, 1915, Gene “The Fighting Marine” Tunney made his professional debut with an eight-round knockout of Bobby Dawson. Tunney was born in the Greenwich Village section New York City in 1897 and was a three-time world champion. His most notable opponent was Jack Dempsey, who he beat in both of their matches. He was elected as Ring Magazine's first-ever Fighter of the Year in 1928 and later elected to the World Boxing Hall of Fame in 1980, the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1990 and the United States Marine Corps Sports Hall of Fame in 2001. He finished his career with a record of 65 wins with one loss and one draw.

On July 9, 1995, Tracy Harris Patterson from New Paltz, NY via Grady Alabama, and adopted son of former Golden Gloves and World Champion Floyd Patterson, knocked down Eddie Hopson four times in the second round to win the IBF Junior Lightweight in Reno, Nevada. Patterson finished his career with 63 wins (43 by KO), 8 losses and two draws. Throughout his career, he fought a multitude of times all over his adopted home state of New York, including Poughkeepsie, Long Beach, Glens Falls, Binghamton, Canastota, Albany, Kerhonkson, the Catskills, Hauppauge, Syracuse and New York City.

On July 10, 1921, Jake “The Raging Bull” LaMotta was born Giacobe LaMotta in The Bronx, NY. He was a World Middleweight Champion and was famously portrayed by Robert De Niro in the film Raging Bull. He was the first man to beat Sugar Ray Robinson. He finished with a career record of 83 wins (30 by KO), 19 losses and four draws. He is a member of the International Boxing Hall of Fame and was ranked 52nd on Ring Magazine's 80 Greatest Fighters of The Past 80 Years. The magazine also ranked him as one of the 10 greatest middleweights of all time.

On July 15, 1984, Kingston, NY’s-own Billy Costello won a 12-round unanimous decision over Ronnie Shields at Kingston’s (Ulster County) Municipal Auditorium to retain his WBC World super lightweight title. He finished his career with a record of 40 wins against two losses.

On July 24, 1925, Tony Canzoneri knocked out Jack Grodner in the very first round in Queens, NY in his professional debut. Although he was born in Louisiana, he and his family moved to Staten Island when he was a teenager. He seldom fought outside New York City and as a matter of a fact, of his first 38 bouts, only one was fought west of New York State. He as a three-division world champion and finished his career with a record of 141 wins against 24 losses and 10 draws.

On July 29, 1965, Theodore A. “Teddy” Atlas, Jr., the renowned American boxing trainer and commentator, was born on Staten Island, NY.


More Boxing History