Contact NYSAC:

David Berlin, Executive Director
Melvina Lathan, Chairperson

New York State Athletic Commission
123 William Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10038

E-mail the Athletic Commission
Telephone: (212) 417-5700
Fax: (212) 417-4987

Deaf, hard of hearing and speech-disabled callers, please use 7-1-1

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Agendas & Open Meeting Documents


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2014 New York State Athletic Commission Licensees (excel xls)

Special Notice

*   *   *   S P E C I A L   N O T I C E   *   *   *

The New York State Athletic Commission will hold testing for Seconds, Managers, and Matchmaker licenses at
10:00 am at 123 William Street, 2nd Floor, New York, NY on the following dates:

Monday, April 20, 2015 Monday, July 20, 2015
Monday, May 18, 2015 August 17, 2015
Monday, June 15, 2015 September 14, 2015

These are BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. To schedule an appointment, call 212-417-5692 or email Ana.Rivas@dos.ny.gov

*2015 Licensing Period lasts from October 1st, 2014 through September 30th, 2015.


Ruling of Special Interest - March 26, 2014
Matter of SAC v. Yagobi et al.


Tony MazzarellaThe New York State Athletic Commission would like to pass on its condolences and sympathies to the family and friends of Joe Dwyer, from Floral Park, NY, a long-time fixture in the New York and national boxing community, who has passed away at the age of 76. Joe boxed as an amateur and worked for more than a decade with the New York State Athletic Commission, eventually rising to chief inspector in 1984. He also spent years as a professional boxing judge, served as the IBF championships chairman and most recently served two terms as president of the NABF, a WBC regional organization. Outside of boxing, Dwyer served in the U.S. Navy and also spent 34 years with the New York Police Department. He is survived by his wife, Linda, and three children.


Tony MazzarellaThe New York State Athletic Commission (NYSAC) would like to pass on its deepest sympathies and condolences to the family and friends of New York City boxing leader Tony Mazzarella, who recently passed away at the age of 75. Mazzarella was a former NYSAC Deputy Commissioner and Inspector, treasurer for the Ring 8 organization, and a New York State Sports Commission member. He also promoted both professional and amateur bouts throughout the area and was a major influence in the founding of the New York State Boxing Hall of Fame. Mazzarella will be sorely missed among New York’s tight-knit boxing community. (photo Courtesy of Ring 8)


The City University of New York and the New York State Athletic Commission Launch “Fight For Your Future” Initiative for New York Boxers

First of its Kind in the U.S. Pilot Program Will Provide Educational, Mentorship and Career Opportunities

The City University of New York (CUNY), in conjunction with the New York State Athletic Commission (NYSAC), USA Boxing Metropolitan Association (“Metro”) and Daily News Charities, Inc.,have announced the launch of a pilot program that will provide professional and amateur boxers in New York State educational opportunities in order to help them compete in today’s economic environment. The program, titled “Fight for Your Future,” aims to provide career options outside the squared circle. 

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An Open Letter from David Berlin, Executive Director, New York State Athletic Commission

To The Entire Boxing Community:

David Berlin, Executive Director, New York State Athletic CommissionAs most of you may already know, I have recently been appointed as the Executive Director of the New York State Athletic Commission. Many of you know me from my work as an attorney representing fighters, as well as others in the boxing community. Some of you also know me from my articles about boxing and the law that have focused largely on ways to implement positive change in the sport and how to protect the boxers who ply their trade in what has been rightly called “the hardest game.” I have always believed that boxers who display their courage and dignity in the ring deserve the sport’s protection.

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Injury Awareness

CONCUSSION: Let's Knock Out Brain Injuries in Boxing!

DEHYDRATION: Stay Hydrated and Avoid Injury Inside and Outside The Ring


Approved Gloves

See what brands, models and weights of boxing gloves are currently approved by the New York State Athletic Commission.


April in New York State
Boxing History

On April 9, 1928, Isadore “Corporal Izzy” Schwartz, who was born in New York 1900, retained his New York State Athletic Commission World Flyweight Title at St. Nicholas Arena by winning a 15-round decision over Routier Parra.

On April 14, 2001, in his New York State debut, Bernard “The Executioner” Hopkins defeated Keith Holmes via a 12-round unanimous decision at New York’s Madison Square Garden to unify the IBF and WBC Middleweight titles. Earlier this year in 2013, Hopkins scored a 12-round unanimous decision over Tavoris Cloud for the IBF Light Heavyweight title in New York’s Barclay’s Center to break his own record (from 2011) of becoming the oldest man in the history of the sport to win a major world boxing title. Hopkins has fought a total of three times in New York and his record stands at 53 wins (32 knockouts), six defeats, two draws and two no contests.

On April 17, 2004, at Madison Square Garden, John Ruiz knocked out challenger Fres Oquendo in the 11th round to retain his WBA World Heavyweight Title.

On April 17, 1967, Italian Nino Benvenuti defeated Emile Griffith by a 15-round unanimous decision in New York’s Madison Square Garden to win the WBA and WBC Middleweight titles in what was named by The Ring magazine as the Fight of the Year for 1967. In a rematch later that year, Griffith went on to defeat Benvenuti at Shea Stadium in a 15-round majority decision to regain the titles. In 1968, these two warriors met yet again with Benvenuti scoring another 15-round unanimous decision over Griffith in the grudge match at The Garden to regain the WBA and WBC Middleweight titles. Benvenuti would go on to finish his career with a record of 82 Wins (35 by knockouts), seven defeats and one draw. In his career, he fought a total of four times in the Empire State.

More Boxing History