Contact NYSAC:

Ndidi Massay, Interim Chair

New York State Athletic Commission
123 William Street, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10038

E-mail the Athletic Commission
Telephone: (212) 417-5700
Fax: (212) 417-4987

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Media Inquiries



Agendas & Open Meeting Documents


Commission Bulletins

2016 New York State Athletic Commission Licensees

Special Notice

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General Business Law Article 41 Combative Sports (pdf)


New York State Athletic Commission Approves Regulations To Govern Combat Sports in New York

New York State Athletic Commission – Approved Regulations –19 NYCRR Parts 206–214 (pdf)


Combat Sports License Application Forms and Instructions



Injury Awareness

CONCUSSION: Let's Knock Out Brain Injuries in Boxing!

DEHYDRATION: Stay Hydrated and Avoid Injury Inside and Outside The Ring


Approved Gloves

See what brands, styles and weights of boxing gloves are currently approved by the New York State Athletic Commission.


March in New York State
Boxing History

On March 8, 1971, “The Greatest” Muhammad Ali fought “Smokin’” Joe Frazier for the first time at New York’s Madison Square Garden in a heavyweight title classic that has been dubbed by many as The Fight of the Century. Frazier gave Ali his first professional defeat, in the first of their three classic bouts (the first two taking place in New York) in one of the greatest boxing rivalries in the history of the sport. Frazier dropped Muhammad Ali in the fifteenth round and scored a unanimous decision to retain the world's Heavyweight title. Former Heavyweight Champion Frazier finished with a professional record of 32 wins (27 by knockout), four defeats and one draw and fought 11 times in the State of New York.

On March 29, 1965, Jose Torres defeated Willie Pastrano via a ninth round technical knockout to win the World Boxing Association and World Boxing Council Heavyweight titles at Madison Square Garden. With that victory, the Puerto Rican-born Torres became the first Hispanic Light-Heavyweight champion in boxing history. Coincidentally, Torres went on to become the Commissioner of the New York State Athletic Commission from 1984 to 1988. He fought a total of 24 times in the State of New York, including in Utica, Buffalo and New York City and finished his professional career with 41 victories against 3 defeats and one draw.

On March 3, 2000, Paul Spadafora won a unanimous 12-round decision over Victoriano Sosa at the Turning Stone Resort & Casino in Verona, NY, to defend his IBF World Lightweight, despite being knocked down twice in the third round.

On March 4, 1968, “Smokin’” Joe Frazier knocked out Buster Mathis in the 11th round of a scheduled 15-rounder to win the vacant New York State Athletic Commission World Heavyweight Title. This particular fight opened the fourth, and current, Madison Square Garden, long-known as “The Mecca of Boxing.”

On March 6, 1985, “Iron” Mike Tyson made his professional boxing debut at the Empire State Plaza Convention Center in Albany, NY, with a first-round knockout of Hector Mercedes. The eventual undisputed Heavyweight Champion of the World, Tyson also fought in a multitude of other locations in his home state of New York early in his career, including Poughkeepsie, Latham, Troy, Long Island, Glens Falls, Swan Lake, and New York City.

On March 13, 1993, New Paltz, NY’s own Tracy Harris Patterson scored a unanimous 12-round decision at the McCann Recreation Center in Poughkeepsie, NY, to retain the WBC World Super Bantamweight Title in front of a vociferous hometown crowd.

On March 28, 1981, Sugar Ray Leonard scored a technical knockout in the 10th round of a scheduled 15-round bout over challenger Larry Bonds at Syracuse, NY’s Carrier Dome to defend his WBC World Welterweight Title.

On March 29, 1965, Jose Torres defeated Willie Pastrano via a ninth round technical knockout to win the World Boxing Association and World Boxing Council Heavyweight titles at Madison Square Garden. With that victory, the Puerto Rican-born Torres became the first Hispanic Light-Heavyweight champion in boxing history. Coincidentally, Torres went on to become the Commissioner of the New York State Athletic Commission from 1984 to 1988. He fought a total of 24 times in the State of New York, including in Utica, Buffalo and New York City and finished his professional career with 41 victories against 3 defeats and one draw.

More Boxing History